Department of Engineering / Profiles / Prof. David Cebon

Department of Engineering

Prof. David Cebon BE, PhD, FREng, FIMechE

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David Cebon

Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Academic Division: Mechanics, Materials and Design

Research group: Applied Mechanics

Telephone: +44 1223 3 32665

Email: dc@eng.cam.ac.uk

Personal website

Publications


Research interests

Dr Cebon's research interests lie in:

  • Centre for Sustainable Road Freight
  • Cambridge Vehicle Dynamics Consortium
  • Heavy vehicle dynamics, design of vehicle suspensions using passive and active components.
  • Heavy vehicle safety, productivity and fuel consumption.
  • Damage mechanisms of bitumens and asphalts.
  • Damage to road surfaces and bridges caused by dynamic wheel forces of heavy goods vehicles.
  • Heavy vehicle 'weigh-in-motion' technology.
  • Use of computers in engineering education.
  • Materials information management.

Strategic themes

Energy, transport and urban infrastructure

Leader of energy, transport and urban infrastructure research theme.

Research projects

Teaching activity

Dynamics, Vibrations, Vehicle Dynamics

Research opportunities

PhD positions available in all research areas of interest.

Other positions

Biography

David Cebon is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in Cambridge University and a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering.  He is Director of the Cambridge Vehicle Dynamics Consortium and the Centre for Sustainable Road Freight and he leads Cambridge University Engineering Department’s Transport Research Group and the Department's research theme 'Energy, Transport and Urban Infrastructure'.  He serves on the Editorial Boards of three international journals.  Professor Cebon’s research covers the mechanical, civil, and materials aspects of road transport engineering.  He has authored or co-authored more than 150 papers on dynamic loads of heavy vehicles, road and bridge response and damage, advanced suspension design for heavy vehicles, heavy vehicle safety and mobility, heavy vehicle fuel consumption and the micromechanics of asphalt deformation and fracture.