Department of Engineering / Profiles / Dr Somenath Bakshi

Department of Engineering

Dr Somenath Bakshi

sb2330

Somenath Bakshi

University Lectureship in Synthetic Biology

Academic Division: Information Engineering

Research group: Control

Telephone: +44 1223 3 32753

Email: sb2330@eng.cam.ac.uk

Personal website

Publications


Research interests

  • Systems biology and Biological Control
  • Engineering synthetic control circuits
  • Engineering synthetic microbial ecosystems
  • Analysis of Natural Microbial Ecosystem and Culturing Unculturable Microbes
  • Analysis of plant-microbe interaction.
  • Quantitative biophysical methods: High-resolution microscopy, Single molecule tracking, High-throughput time-lapse microscopy, Novel microfluidic platforms

Strategic themes

Bioengineering

Engineering Control Circuits and microbial communities. Developing Microfluidic and Microscopic platforms for analysis of microbial eco-systems. 

Biography

Somenath Bakshi is a new University Lecturer in Synthetic Biology. He is a single molecule biophysicist by training. He did his PhD in University of Wisconsin Madison under Professor James Weisshaar – developing super-resolution imaging technologies to study central cellular processes in microbes. After finishing his PhD, he moved to Harvard University for his postdoc with Professor Johan Paulsson. During his postdoc Somenath developed high-throughput timelapse imaging technologies of single microbes in controlled complex growth-conditions. He has also developed a novel self-erasable fluorescence barcoding system, which enables harnessing the throughput for boosting multiplexing capabilities, without any need for cloning and sequencing. Though most of his work has focused on methods and approaches to synthetic biology, he remains interested in quantifying the dynamics and control of natural circuits. In fact much of the work from his postdoc focused on real biological circuits, studying circuits involved in stress-response regulation and their impact on persistence of microbes towards antibiotics.

Department role and responsibilities