Department of Engineering / News / IDBE alumna awarded Senior Fulbright Fellowship to Haiti

Department of Engineering

IDBE alumna awarded Senior Fulbright Fellowship to Haiti

IDBE alumna awarded Senior Fulbright Fellowship to Haiti

Designed by Professor Jann for the tropics - a zero carbon solar louvered disaster-resilient shelter.

IDBE alumna Professor Marga Jann has been awarded a Senior Fulbright Fellowship to Haiti (and the Eastern Caribbean), commencing in October.

As a recipient of the Senior Fulbright Fellowship, Professor Jann will be working on post-disaster reconstruction, environmental management and socio-cultural implications of planning prerogatives and initiatives, spending time both teaching and researching.

Professor Jann, RIBA, AIA, completed the Department’s Interdisciplinary Design for the Built Environment (IDBE) Masters of Studies (MSt) course, supported by the Departments of Architecture and Engineering and is now a Visiting Research Fellow at the Department of Sociology.

As a recipient of the Senior Fulbright Fellowship, Professor Jann will be working on post-disaster reconstruction, environmental management and socio-cultural implications of planning prerogatives and initiatives, spending time both teaching and researching.

The Fulbright Program is the flagship international educational exchange programme sponsored by the U.S. Government.

It is designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the USA and other countries. Currently, the Fulbright Programme operates in more than 160 countries worldwide.

Professor Jann’s current research focuses on Urban and Cultural Sociology and Sustainable Design, working within the Department of Sociology, Energy@Cambridge, and Cambridge Big Data.

She is exploring and testing smart systems for energy use and regulation in buildings, and also looking at lightning as a possible energy generator (in Bolivia).

Her research has also concentrated on energy-focused urban and cultural planning issues within cities in the tropics and developing world, examining how shelter and infrastructure can adapt to accommodate mass migration, while considering the socio-cultural implications of displacement, homelessness and natural and man-made disasters.

This article has been edited from the University of Cambridge Department of Sociology website.

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