Department of Engineering / News / Professor Julian Allwood’s research into metal forming technology honoured with award

Department of Engineering

Professor Julian Allwood’s research into metal forming technology honoured with award

Professor Julian Allwood’s research into metal forming technology honoured with award

Julian Allwood, Professor of Engineering and the Environment, has been awarded the highest international recognition for research related to metal forming – the 2021 JSTP International Prize for Research & Development in Precision Forging.

Due to climate change, we are moving into an era in which we will produce much less metal. The focus of metal forming will change rapidly, and I look forward to exploring the consequences with the younger researchers attending the International Seminar on Precision Forging next year.

Professor Julian Allwood

Comprising a gold medal and substantial cash prize, the award was announced on 26 July at the opening ceremony of the 13th International Conference on the Technology of Plasticity. The award, presented by the Japan Society for Technology of Plasticity (JSTP), recognises distinguished researchers who have contributed to the worldwide advancement of metal forming technology with high quality research work. It is presented every three years to two leading researchers, and Professor Allwood shares the 2021 prize with Professor Paolo Martins of the University of Lisbon.

In presenting the award, Professor Kazuhiko Kitamura, Chairman of the JSTP, cited Professor Allwood’s work on innovative metal forming process inventions, on the science of metal deformation and related to the holistic analysis of energy and metal use. He also praised Professor Allwood’s work in preparing the community for tomorrow, through outreach to schoolchildren, 10 years as joint editor-in-chief of the Journal of Material Processing Technology, and by his chairmanship of metal forming activities at the International Academy of Production Engineering.

On accepting the award, Professor Allwood acknowledged the career support he had received from past winners of the Prize and other members of the JSTP. He also thanked the many members of his team who have contributed to the research work over the past 25 years and to the large group who worked with him to deliver the 12th ICTP Conference, dubbed the ‘Olympics of metal forming’, which was held in Cambridge, in 2017.

“I am, of course, receiving this award on behalf of my group, The Use Less Group, and I would like to thank all of the people who have been a part of our shared journey,” he said. “I would particularly like to mention the enormous team who worked with me on ICTP 2017 and Dr Christopher Cleaver who leads our lab today with great intelligence and kindness.”

He added: “Due to climate change, we are moving into an era in which we will produce much less metal. The focus of metal forming will change rapidly, and I look forward to exploring the consequences with the younger researchers attending the International Seminar on Precision Forging next year.”

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