Department of Engineering / News / New Centre for Doctoral Studies in Future Infrastructure and Built Environment

Department of Engineering

New Centre for Doctoral Studies in Future Infrastructure and Built Environment

New Centre for Doctoral Studies in Future Infrastructure and Built Environment

Professor Robert Mair

The University of Cambridge’s new Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT) in Future Infrastructure and Built Environment led by Professor Robert Mair, is now open to applicants for entry in October 2014.

The CDT offers a wide range of exciting PhD subjects as well as a pioneering MRes course in the first year. It builds on Cambridge's considerable strengths and research expertise across many aspects of civil engineering, including our Centre for Smart Infrastructure and Construction (CSIC) and the Laing O'Rourke Centre for Construction Engineering and Technology.

Professor Robert Mair

CDTs are a bold new approach to training PhD students. They are an initiative widely supported by business and industry.

The aim of each centre is to create a community of researchers working on current and future challenges. The multidisciplinary centres bring together diverse areas of expertise to train engineers and scientists with the skills, knowledge and confidence to tackle today’s evolving issues. They also create new working cultures, build relationships between teams in universities and forge lasting links with industry at a range of levels, from small and medium-sized enterprises to large, multinational corporations. 

The CDT in Future Infrastructure and Built Environment will focus on integrating Cambridge's internationally recognised strength in structures, geotechnics, materials, construction, sustainable development, building physics and water and waste within the wider context of related engineering disciplines - architecture, the sciences, land economy, manufacturing, business, economics, policy and the social sciences.

The key research themes will include construction design and technology; building physics; future energy infrastructure; asset management; sustainability and urbanisation; construction materials and waste minimisation; water and waste; computing technologies and infrastructure resilience against natural hazards.

"The CDT offers a wide range of exciting PhD subjects as well as a pioneering MRes course in the first year. It builds on Cambridge's considerable strengths and research expertise across many aspects of civil engineering, including our Centre for Smart Infrastructure and Construction (CSIC) and the Laing O'Rourke Centre for Construction Engineering and Technology", says Professor Mair.

The CDT is based at the Department of Engineering at the University of Cambridge and funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). Its aim is to provide a world-leading education, creating engineering leaders of tomorrow with strong commercial and technical skills, equipped to face current and future infrastructure and built environment challenges.

Further details can be found at http://www.cdt-civil.eng.cam.ac.uk/